2nd Amendment to the Constitution of The United States of America

A well regulated militia, being necessary to the security of a free state, the right of the people to keep and bear arms, shall not be infringed.

"I ask sir, what is the militia? It is the whole people except for a few politicians."
- George Mason (father of the Bill of Rights and The Virginia Declaration of Rights)

Thursday, June 23, 2011

Yes, slow zombies are better....




Ironic, just last week I heard an interview with Shaun of the Dead's Simon Pegg on a local radio station. I really liked that movie, a comedy with zombies and characters you could not help but to fall in love with. Now today on a forum I found a link to a piece he did on the UK Guardian web site bemoaning the fast zombie characterized in many of today's zed flicks. I must agree, the running zombie, while certainly frightening, is not any better than the slow, shambling creature that we traditionally view in the role. Article link below....

The dead and the quick

A few years back the running zombie became all the craze with the remake of the Dawn of the Dead movie from Romero's franchise. Decent flick and it had its good parts, but the running zombie was a bit much for a lot of die hard zed purists. The height of running zombie idiocy was in the Day of the Dead remake where zed's somehow gained the ability to climb walls like insects and leap far distances.It seems in the Walking Dead series on AMC they have a hybrid, a zombie that walks slowly about but can speed up for very short distances to catch its prey.

Before the zombie was a prepper euphemism for those that would be knocking on the prepper's door after the SHTF unprepared as a threat...the zombie held another place in our subconcious mind...that of the fear of dying ourselves. Pegg puts it excellently in this paragraph...
More significantly, the fast zombie is bereft of poetic subtlety. As monsters from the id, zombies win out over vampires and werewolves when it comes to the title of Most Potent Metaphorical Monster. Where their pointy-toothed cousins are all about sex and bestial savagery, the zombie trumps all by personifying our deepest fear: death. Zombies are our destiny writ large. Slow and steady in their approach, weak, clumsy, often absurd, the zombie relentlessly closes in, unstoppable, intractable.

Yes, the slow zombie can bring so much more tension to a story plot as far as I am concerned. So for me, bring on the shamblers!!

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